Pig-Pen, Oxen, and a Glorious Mess

Todd Van DykeFaith, Hope

Do you remember the Charlie Brown character Pig-Pen from the famous Peanuts cartoon strip? He was Charlie Brown’s friend, who always seemed to have a cloud of dust following him where ever he went.  He could never get clean.  There was one time he was able to get clean, but as soon as he went outside, he instantly became dirty, declaring himself “A dust magnet.”

Most days as a father to 4 children, I think that we might have given birth to 4 Pig-Pens.  Often it is not dust that seems to be radiating and originating from my children, although that will change as Summer gets closer. No, my children seem to be swirled in a dust cloud of their own things.  Crayons and Legos, empty juice boxes and used sucker sticks, goldfish crackers and socks. 

You might suspect that my wife and I have never taught our children what and where trash bins are in our house. Or you might think that we prefer dirty clothes to sit for days in the first spot they land, not in the dirty hamper.  Or you might suspect that we prefer our children to take off their shoes and to make getting anywhere on time more fun by playing that stress-free game of “Where did my other shoe end up?” You would be wrong.  We really try to teach our kids about trash bins, clothes hampers, and how to put their shoes away.  Alas, somedays it feels like our kids our Pig-Pen.  They are just “dust, Lego, crayon, empty juice box, goldfish crackers in the couch cushion” magnets.

 A few weeks I came home to some creation sitting on our side table.  It was a penny and peppermint glued inside a small coin box that I got my children on my last trip to Costa Rica.  The box was held up by a Lego man.  When I asked my kids what in the world this thing was, my youngest told me, as if I was crazy for not recognizing it at first sight, that it was clearly, a “Leprechaun Trap”. Of course, a Leprechaun trap! How could I not have known?

Or this last week, as the weather was getting warmer, I came home to my kids outside with craft supplies making something.  All I could think about at the time was how much of that stuff will I have to pick up.  Who is going to leave the glue out? How many-colored pencils will be left out and how many will be put back in the box? Why do they have tape, and will they not ever make a mess?

It was later that night however that I went into our master bathroom and there on the mirror was taped a piece of paper from one of my kids.  It read:

 Mom and Dad, I love you guys.

(I+ drawn heart+ drawn stick figures to represent my wife and I)

Here (Heres) some flowers for good luck.

And taped to the paper where two flowers (probably weeds)

That paper is still up in our bathroom today.  And it reminded me of an interesting verse in Proverbs.

“Where there are no oxen, the manger is clean, but abundant crops come by the strength of the ox.”

Proverbs 14:4

This may seem like an interesting verse to think about, but I think it has a lot to do with family life and ministry to the family.

Oxen are dirty, they are expensive, and they are time consuming.  But if you want a harvest you must have them.  There was no getting around this for the ancient Israelites.  You can have a clean feeding trough (manger) or you can have abundant crops.  But you really can’t have both.

We live in a world that continually tries to tell families that they can have it all.  That you can have the perfect house, the perfect kids, the perfect vacation, the perfect on and on and on.  And we are constantly bombarded by these images through entertainment, commercials, and social media.  It even has a name online, it’s called the “curated life”. Curated means selected, organized, and presented using professional or expert knowledge.  People have even started posting about their curated messy-life, which is just a form of emotional showmanship that masquerades itself as vulnerability. God’s wisdom tells us this.  Life is messy.  You can’t avoid it.  But there is a harvest that can come with the mess.

The glorious thing is that God cares so much for us.  He cares about the small things in life and he cares about the big things.  He knew ancient farmers would worry about barns and troughs that never could get cleaned.  He cares about moms and dads, at work and at home, caring for their families in 1,000 different ways. 

Life is messy and Life is beautiful, and life is somehow beautiful because it is messy.  And that sentence wouldn’t make any sense if it weren’t for the Good News of the gospel of Jesus Christ. Who makes something beautiful out our of mess.

Because every so often, out of the mess, you might get something like this: